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About Deviant Arvin61R58Male/United States Recent Activity
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:iconneurotic-idealist:
Neurotic-Idealist Featured By Owner Jan 16, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks for the faves! :)
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:iconarvin61r58:
Arvin61R58 Featured By Owner Jan 19, 2016
You are welcome!
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:iconpajunen:
Pajunen Featured By Owner Oct 31, 2015  Hobbyist Photographer
Thanks for the :+fav:
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:iconarvin61r58:
Arvin61R58 Featured By Owner Oct 31, 2015
You're Welcome :)
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:iconjonathanbluestone:
JonathanBluestone Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks for adding some of my art to your favorites. Please also be advised that all of my work is forwarded to my legal advisor and filed as intellectual property - sadly, I've had to do this since art theft forced me to prosecute several offenders who utilized pieces without permission, and in a couple of instances for profit.

I notice you mention the RISC OS. Were you ever an Acorn user?
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:iconarvin61r58:
Arvin61R58 Featured By Owner Edited Oct 30, 2015
You are welcome and thank you.  I am sorry to here that people used your work without permission.

I have not used an Acorn computer.  Acorn did not have a strong foothold here in The States and I am not sure if there was even a market for them in the US.  Been using computers since the 1980's so I have a interest in retro computing.  I discovered Acorn while doing research on the subject.  If memory serves me correctly, it was at Toasty Tech: GUI Gallery (toastytech.com/guis/)  where I discovered Acorn.
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:iconjonathanbluestone:
JonathanBluestone Featured By Owner Edited Oct 30, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
I actually worked for them during the mid-Eighties as a programmer. The American market did include the Acorn Computer, although it was known under another name which for the moment escapes me. It was purchased in bulk for American schools (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BBC_Micr…) as at the time it offered superior computing, networking (in 1983 no less via something known as the ECONET) and featured an integrated disc access system (the disc drive had to be plugged into the machines underside, but software for the machine was in the form of ROMs (Read Only Memory) chips, with the BBC one being the Disc Operating System (DFS) with the  1770 being the most popular of the lot. Acorn computers unlike modern machines had their Operating System on a 8K or 16K Eprom so it could not be corrupted. Word processing applications for it were numerous, but also on ROM so it was necessary to purchase "Sideways Expansion Boards" which basically plugged into a slot on the EPROM bed and which routed any paged ROMS into the main system on demand.

Programming was non-GUI (text only). In fact we did not even have mice until the invention of the IBM emulator board (I tested this on a BBC Micro / Master 512 machine 1985-86) with primitive DOS applications. The BBC Micro or 'Beeb' as it was known supported many applications, among the EDWORD (word processor), sound chips and all manner of devices and could be expanded by simply plugging in an external device known as a TUBE. When  was at college in the mid-Eighties I used to network these machines so everyone could use the resources of a central server. We also used a medium known as TELETEXT which was a low-definition graphics/text information medium (in Britain it was used for services known as CEEFAX, ORACLE, 4-TEL and for primitive early bulletin board server software such as PRESTEL). I advise you research these if you want to know more about Eighties machines. I actually wrote Assembler and BBC BASIC programs for CEEFAX's Telesoftware broadcasts, including a TELETEXT editor that allowed people to make their own pages using what was known as MODE7 on the machine.

Storage was initially on tape cassette but by the early Eighties we had 40 Track floppy discs which were 5 1/2'' in size. Later the capacity was changed to 80 Track without changing the design of the disc. Images of much of this hardware appears in my gallery. Floppy discs operated in pretty much the same way that Hard Drives do today, an arm would move and read sectors on the disc with a slow "shunk-chunk-chunk-chunk" sound and then load into the machine. Eventually a form of primitive hard drive was introduced, the Winchester Drive and the very first Laser Disc system, the technology that you now use today. I actually miss those old machines. They were highly reliable, built like battleships and very hard to break. If you have specific questions, contact me and I'll do my best to assist. You can also read more here: www.computerhistory.org/atchm/… - I still own an original BBC Microcomputer Model B and a Master 128 machine, although I do not believe that either of them are still operational and even if they were, I have no cables, no floppy disc drive, no media ... there is a lesson to be learned here. The hardware that exists now will be a curiosity in thirty years time and you too will be wondering why we ever got along with it!
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:iconarvin61r58:
Arvin61R58 Featured By Owner Oct 31, 2015
Thank you for the information, much appreciated.
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:iconlust0fadeeperpain:
Lust0fADeeperPain Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2015
Favorite 2 by Katarina-Zirine 
I appreciate it very much Arvin
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:iconarvin61r58:
Arvin61R58 Featured By Owner Jan 5, 2015

You are welcome.  Your photos are very beautiful. :)

 
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